Tempus Fugit

Last Saturday, I was sitting in the living room of one friend and visiting with another. Today they are both gone. Our hostess suffered a stroke on Tuesday and expired this morning. My other friend, who lived alone, was found by her son this morning. Last week they were both full of life and plans, with things to do and places to go and people to see.

Evidently God had another plan. We are told that He does.

13 For you created my inmost being; you knit me together in my mother’s womb. 14 I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made;  your works are wonderful, I know that full well. 15 My frame was not hidden from you when I was made in the secret place. When I was woven together in the depths of the earth, 16 your eyes saw my unformed body. All the days ordained for me were written in your book before one of them came to be. Psalm 139:13-16 (NIV)

I am reminded of the story about the three minions of the devil who are brainstorming the best way to recruit people into hell.

The first said “We’ll just convince people there is no God.” But that suggestion was rejected because there is a God-shaped hole in every soul that draws breath.

The second said “We’ll cast doubt on the veracity of the Bible. After all it is simply a myth written by men.” But that suggestion, too, was rejected because  of the extra-biblical writings that confirm the scriptures.

The suggestion that was adopted, however, was this. “We’ll acknowledge God and the scriptures, but we’ll just convince them there is plenty of time.”  Procrastination has invited more people into eternal damnation than outright evil.

Jesus himself warned us in this parable.

16And he spake a parable unto them, saying, The ground of a certain rich man brought forth plentifully: 17And he thought within himself, saying, What shall I do, because I have no room where to bestow my fruits? 18And he said, This will I do: I will pull down my barns, and build greater; and there will I bestow all my fruits and my goods. 19And I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry. 20But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided? 21So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God. Luke 12:16-21 (KJV)

My friend, if you have been procrastinating your decision for God, please don’t hesitate any longer. He’s waiting for you, longing for you to come to Him in fellowship. Answer His invitation, today, please.

 

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About Judith Robl

Speaker - Author - Editor - Writing Coach
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10 Responses to Tempus Fugit

  1. I think most of us can relate to the struggle with procrastination!
    I always hate death, although I know God doesn’t if He’s taking home some of his own. I am thankful for His patience with us.
    Love you much,
    Geni

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  2. Judith Robl says:

    As you well know, the procrastination thing has been my bug-a-boo since forever. It just struck home that I really need to be about the business of the writing I’ve been called to do.

    I can just imagine you and the girls at David’s grave. Beautiful scene, bittersweet memories.

    Love and prayers to you all.

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  3. Sally Lewis says:

    Judy, I am so very sorry to hear of the sudden loss of your dear friends. May God’s peace and blessings be with you. At our age we may have become accustomed to loss but we are seldom prepared for it. Eugene Peterson says “We live our lives in the practice of what we do not originate and cannot anticipate” and I think that is mainly true.
    Your elegant commentary, in the wake of your loss, is a testament to your abiding faith. It also spoke, reprovingly, to my procrastinating heart.

    Saturday I’d spent the day with 3 of my girls visiting David’s grave; they had brought yellow roses in remembrance of his birthday. As we stood there, in the shade of whispering pine trees, sharing the company of bright red resurrection lilies blooming by the headstones I was reminded again of Wendell Berry’s admonition, repeated each year in so many Easter sermon’s, to ‘practice resurrection’, daily. Berry even provides a rough blueprint for that practice in his poem; love the Lord, work for nothing, expect the end of the world, laugh, ‘Be joyful though you have considered all the facts’ everyday do something that does not compute.

    How do I practice resurrection daily if I do not start by ending my procrastination?

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  4. Laura Best says:

    So sorry for your loss, Judith. It is sometimes difficult to understand these things, and yet I feel the need to say that it is not our job to understand. Is it?

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    • Judith Robl says:

      The comfort comes in knowing Who knows.

      We can be assured that nothing happens to surprise God. I’ve yet to take something to Him in prayer and have Him say “Oh, really! I didn’t know that.”

      Generally it’s “I’ve been waiting for you to come to me with that.”

      While He’s in charge, we don’t have to understand. We need simply to rely on Him.

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  5. Judith Robl says:

    And I am exceptionally blessed to have two young friends like the two of you, Patsy and Shadia.

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  6. Judith, this is frighteningly sobering. An excellent reminder but so tragic to have to come through such a painful trail. Thank you for your courage, and example.
    May God’s peace and Presence blanket you with comfort,
    Shadia

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    • Judith Robl says:

      Thank you, Shadia. When you get to my age, it is painfully obvious that life is short. I’m very grateful that both my friends had made their decisions for Christ years ago. That is a comfort.

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  7. So sorry to hear about your losses. We all know intellectually that things can change instantly, but I think it would be hard to live that way emotionally. So, we make plans, understanding we may never get to carry them out, but proceeding as if we will.

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